Contribution information

Title Fuel Quality Syngas Production by Two Stage Pyrolysis/Gasification of Solid Waste and Biomass
Status Accepted
Final type Lecture
Final session WAS&BIO - Waste and biomass as sustainable energy and material sources
Authors J., Haydary1, J., Husár2, P., Šuhaj3
1 Institute of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Chemical and Food Technology, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Bratislava, Slovakia
2 Slovak University of Technology, Bratislava, Slovakia
3 Institute of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Chemical and Food Technology, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Bratislava, Slovakia
Brief content Generally, the gasification technologies for waste and biomass gasification currently operating worldwide are based on coal gasification. These technologies face currently one or more technical challenges such as low gas quality (low heating value, high tar content), conversion limitations and feed heterogeneity. To be used in internal combustion engines or turbines, the gas should fulfil relatively strict requirements for gas composition, heating value and tar content. Production of fuel quality gas requires the removal of tar from the producer gas and reduction the concentration of noncombustible components such as N2 and CO2. This work deals with an alternative technology for waste and biomass gasification which employs a two stage pyrolysis/gasification system with a secondary catalytic tar cracking system. Different configurations of two stage pyrolysis/gasification systems with great potential of producing tar free, high hydrogen content syngas from different types of hydrogenous solid waste are presented. Results of laboratory scale experiments using different types of catalysts prepared by calcination (carbonization) at different conditions and/or impregnation with Ni are concluded in this work. The catalysts were characterized by pore structure and specific surface measurement (before and after use), thermogravimetric analysis, elemental analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis. In the first step, the catalyst activity was tested by cracking of a model organic compound at different conditions. In the next step, the catalysts were used for cracking of tars in a two stage laboratory scale gasification unit, where the composition of producer gas and gas tar content were observed for different process conditions and catalyst types. As the raw material in these experiments, RDF (Refused-Derived Fuel, a fraction of municipal solid waste, MSW) was used.
ID 64